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“View Bob McDonnell With Alarm!” (E-I-E-I-O)

Let’s face it: Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell is an inept head of state who can’t even manage to keep his culture warrior pants neatly pressed. For anyone who’s been paying attention, he’s already done enough to disqualify himself from any Presidential ambitions he’s widely thought to entertain.

First, there was the embarrassing imbroglio over gay rights, when he had to act to quell a public riot over his Attorney General’s “request” to the states’ universities that they rescind any non-discrimination policies protecting gays and lesbians. Ken Cuccinelli’s AG opinion had been given whiskey courage by McDonnell’s own “guess the missing words” Executive Order that had promised not to discriminate on almost every conceivable basis — except sexual orientation. But when McDonnell faced the heat over Cuccinelli’s tone-deaf follow-up, he flamed out spectacularly, issuing a strongly worded “Executive Directive” that did protect against sexual orientation discrimination in state government, citing a number of legal sources he’d somehow missed in putting forth his earlier Order. The full story is here.

At the time, I wrote that McDonnell was an especially wimpy kind of culture warrior: One who believed in all sorts of natural law piffle about homosexuality, but didn’t have the courage of his convictions, when challenged. Today, he’s provided Exhibits B through about ZZ in support of my point. It turns out that sometime last week he’d issued some kind of play-to-the-Dixie-base proclamation that April was to be Confederate History Month. Unless April suddenly runs for only about two days, though, it seems like there’d be some time in that month to consider the role of, oh, slavery in the Civil War and the confederacy. Instead, silence on that small detail, in favor of this gush: It’s important to “understand the sacrifices of the Confederate leaders, soldiers and citizens during the period of the Civil War, and to recognize how our history has led to our present.”1

When initially questioned on the omission, McDonnell, typically, made matters worse with this read-it-to-believe-it statement:

McDonnell said he did not include a reference to slavery because “there were any number of aspects to that conflict between the states. Obviously, it involved slavery. It involved other issues. But I focused on the ones I thought were most significant for Virginia.”

It “involved” slavery? And that wasn’t one of the most significant issues “for Virginia”? Translation: It wasn’t one of the issues that the base wanted him to focus on, and he thought he could slip the Proclamation through. But it didn’t work. By today, the outrage — now reinforced by this inane ‘explanation’ — had reached a level eerily reminiscent of what had whacked him after GayGate. And again, McDonnell apologized (caved, backed down, went into pillbug protective mode) and wrote a brand new Proclamation that prominently mentioned slavery. As with the Executive Directive, you can’t fault the statement on content, even though we’re now more than a week into the month that’s being proclaimed:

Whereas, it is important for all Virginians to understand that the institution of slavery led to this war and was an evil and inhumane practice that deprived people of their God-given inalienable rights and all Virginians are thankful for its permanent eradication from our borders, and the study of this time period should reflect upon and learn from this painful part of our history….

So, here’s the disturbing pattern that’s emerged: McDonnell does something that he thinks will energize “the base” but doesn’t stop to consider that every other group then wants his head on a pike. Once they show up at the statehouse, complete with flaming torches and pitchforks, he chuckles over the silly misunderstanding, issues an apology, and tells them to return to their homes.

Didn’t he run on a platform of fiscal responsibility and competitiveness? Bob, forget about your incinerated Presidential aspirations and stick to basics for a few years.

  1. Wait! Our history has led to our present?! Why didn’t I think of that?
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