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Log Cabin (Republican) Syrup

April 23rd, 2009 1 comment

A gay friend of mine moved from New Haven, CT (he was a Yale professor) to Columbus, Ohio for a year. His dating life, he told me, was a disaster: “Every guy I met told me on the first date that he was a Log Cabin Republican.” There were no second dates.

http://www.otrcat.com/z/log_cabin_syrup_1938.jpg

For  those who don’t know, the Log Cabin Republicans are a gay advocacy group that, roughly, adheres to certain “old school”  Republican values like lower taxes and limited government (federalism, as convenient, too) while pressing for LGB (but not always T) equality. They’re mostly a bunch of well-to-do white guys. Their argument for existence is that they can work within to transform the Republican Party in what is, after all, a two-party system.

I’m not one of them. My politics are decidedly to the left, and I generally favor a substantial role for government in working towards social justice (while realizing the limits of this reliance, the benefits of markets,  and the importance of grass roots advocacy and effort). And my  view of the group wasn’t exactly improved after an argument in 2004 with one Log Cabin member who, to my astonishment, supported Bush over Kerry, even asserting that there was “no difference” between them on gay issues. We were (not close)  friends before this, not at all after that.

But there he was in late 2008, at a March for Equality in Philadelphia. We walked together. He stated that he’d been an Obama supporter, and that the Republican party was in danger of becoming a “fringe.” I then regretted my boorish behavior in 2004 (I wasn’t exactly civil, I’m afraid) and sent him an email of apology. His response was more than gracious, and he owned some responsibility, too. I wisely refrained from asking about his continued association with the Log Cabin.

Now I’m feeling a bit more charitable towards the group. A recent story reported that the Log Cabin had been involved in getting the leadership of the Republican Party in the New York Senate to allow its members to “vote their conscience” on the pending marriage equality bill. Given that at least four Democrats are poised to vote “no,” this step could spell the difference between success and failure. It would be neither fair nor charitable to deny that the group has had success in galvanizing what’s left of the moderate wing of the Republican party; as a sign of their effect, they and Meghan McCain apparently have a thing goin’ on, too. If she’s the face of young Republicans (or at least enough of them), then we can have a legitimate debate about policy that takes equality as a given and moves on from there.

But I’m still not syrupy sweet on the Log Cabin. They support formal equality, and their blog lists some recent accomplishments at the state legislative level that are, frankly, impressive. But what about addressing the deep and underlying inequities of race, gender, and even sexual orientation  and gender identity? Formal equality doesn’t really get to those messier issues. Marriage equality won’t help an adult woman who needs time off to take care of her ailing sister or grandchild, neither of whom is covered by the Family and Medical Leave Act. A law prohibiting discrimination in the workplace doesn’t address the issue of whether employees make a living wage.

But they’re not the only group that focuses on formal equality, and, if I’m being fair about it, they seem to be making more inroads lately than the national, non-partisan Human Rights Campaign, whose efforts on hate crimes, anti-discrimination laws, and repeal of the Defense of Marriage Act have yet to bear fruit. (Here’s an example of their behind-the-scenes achievements, though.)

So am I ready to enter a post-partisan era? Nah.

DC About to Provide a Preview of Congressional Marriage Equality Debate?

April 10th, 2009 No comments

Even as Vermont was breaking through the Governor’s veto to enact a marriage equality law on Tuesday, the District of Columbia’s Council was voting unanimously (12-zip) to recognize same-sex marriages from other states. This was a preliminary vote; the Real Deal happens in early May. Then what?

The Home Rule Act of 1973 gave the District some long-overdue autonomy, but Congress couldn’t resist retaining a veto for itself: As set forth on the DC Council’s website, “Congress reviews all legislation passed by the Council before it can become law….” This could make for an interesting summer.

Note, first, that this isn’t the marriage equality bill: The council  members support equality, but are sticking a tentative toe into the whirlpool of Congressional politics. If this gets through, expect a full equality bill on its heels. So, what might happen to this trial balloon?

The easiest approach would be to, er, punt. This outcome seems to me likely. Here’s what one Congressman had to say in 2007 about approving DC’s  needle-exchange program: “You know, I came here to be a member of the United States Congress. I didn’t come here to be a member of the D.C. City Council.” Inasmuch as the Dems control everything in Congress right now, all but the most blood-red state Republicans might sit this one out, deferring to home rule and avoiding the merits of the debate.

Or they might take the advice of right-wing pundits like Michael Goldfarb and use the opportunity to make their (blue dog?) Democratic colleagues squirm. But will they squirm? It seems that either  side can use, as convenience dictates, arguments about home rule and about federalism (although, strictly speaking, this isn’t federalism as DC’s status has always been unique — and, more to the point, it’s not even a state).

But moderates in Congress might not find it necessary to avoid the merits. If marriage equality itself is directly up for discussion,we’ll get a good sense of where lawmakers stand, and likely a first read on the likelihood that the Defense of Marriage Act might be repealed sometime soon.