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Posts Tagged ‘negligence’

“Take a Long Walk Off a Short Pier!”

June 7th, 2010 No comments

Lauren Rosenberg is suing Google after being struck by a car. Why? Because the company’s walking map suggested a less than relaxing constitutional across a busy state road with no sidewalk. This case seems silly — who wouldn’t simply decide for themselves whether a suggested road was the best way to travel? I mean, couldn’t she just have ignored the advice?

Legal issues are rarely that simple, though. Note that the complaint states that Goggle issued a warning about the unreliability of the recommendations, but you only received the full warning if on a computer — not on a mobile phone, and that’s what the plaintiff alleges she used. So in a sense Google might have been better off not warning at all; if it thought a warning was necessary, then it should be provided across platforms. (A Google spokesperson says there was a warning on the phone version, but that it was shorter.) One might even argue that it’s more necessary on a mobile app, because walkers would presumably be likelier than others to use a cell phone, and less able to “check their work” on a phone.

Read the linked article for some of the interesting facts about the case, including that it was dark at the time she was “advised” to cross the street. Does this make her negligent for crossing an unfamiliar street in the early morning hours, or does it strengthen the argument that Google should have made clearer that one shouldn’t rely on its advice? Perhaps both, and, if so, the law recognizes that possibility through the doctrine of comparative negligence — if a jury found that both were negligent (assuming the court first holds that Google owed Ms. Rosenberg a legal duty in the first place), then her recovery would be reduced by the percentage of negligence attributed to her conduct.

Rosenberg’s attorney, whose legal writing makes me shudder (she was “stricken” by a car, for example), has also sued the driver of the auto. Good move. That’s likely to be the only party (besides Rosenberg her very own self) found substantially at fault by the jury.

By the way, the research conducted for this post was done by Googling the topic, so please don’t rely on the facts presented.

9/11, Katrina, and the BP Oil Spill: The Inconsistency of Compensation

May 29th, 2010 2 comments

The by-now predictable, tedious, and irresponsible Republican bulwark against raising or eliminating the criminally low liability cap that would leave claimant against BP out in the cold really has me frosted. And it’s gotten me thinking about how we compensate people for loss in front-page cases: September 11; Katrina; and this BP oil “spill.”

Let’s talk about who was responsible for these tragedies, and how the victims have (or haven’t been) compensated for their losses.

September 11 was, of course, a terrorist act, but under established principles of tort law, other actors could be liable: airport security, airlines, and — further down the chain — the federal government, for missing the warning signs. But the government, to bail out the struggling airline industry, and in an effort to pile sandbags full of money at the border, created the Victim Compensation Fund. At taxpayer expense, the Fund (not really a “fund” at all) paid out more than seven billion dollars, mostly to surviving family members of those killed when the Towers fell. Some received millions, because payment was largely based on a tort model. I’ve criticized this approach, noting that government should not be compensating people as though they’re tort victims, and that doing so reflects a confusion between the principles of corrective justice (righting an imbalance between two parties caused by one party’s negligence) and distributive justice (deciding how best to allocate the resources across society).

To call what happened in New Orleans “Katrina” is really a misnomer, because the hurricane isn’t what caused the widespread and continuing destruction of large sections of the city: the government did so, through the negligence of the Army Corps of Engineers in connection with the building and maintenance of the levee system, and of untold bureaucrats in designing the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet (“MR-GO”). The government is immune from suit for the levee failure (but not for MR-GO related negligence), so those injured, financially wrecked, or rendered homeless in the wake of Katrina had to content themselves with the meager assistance afforded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. (Criticisms of FEMA’s response are legion and some, like this one from Kevin Drum in Mother Jones, are devastating; but they miss the more central issue.) I’ve criticized this approach in several places, including the documentary film “America Betrayed,” and this article.

Now comes the BP disaster, which threatens to swamp the rest. Yet because of an ill-considered federal law that I discussed here, BP will be liable for clean-up, but for only a relative pittance ($75 million) for liability to those economically or otherwise ruined. Unless this cap is lifted — and the legal change is made to apply retroactively — or unless there’s a government “fund” created, many of those destroyed by BP’s probable criminal acts will be entitled to…nothing.

How can our different responses to these tragedies be explained? Only by thinking about politics and power, not by looking at justice. But there might be a limit: Expect the law to change, and for BP to be held accountable. (Please!) If not, President Obama has suggested that the taxpayers will be on the hook. If we are (and I wouldn’t object), let’s spend more time thinking about a better model of compensation when we’re all left holding the bag.

And we must demand more comprehensive regulation: As Rachel Maddow pointed out this week (with her outrage well-justified by the facts), a similar spill went on for months about thirty years ago, and the same useless efforts were made then, as now, to stop it. She concludes, correctly, that Big Oil has gotten much better about drilling deeper and deeper (200 feet v. 5,000 feet), with correspondingly higher risks, but not any better at all about stopping it once it happens. Enough.

U.S. Government: Compensate Katrina Victims

November 21st, 2009 1 comment

The recent news that a federal judge has ruled the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and by extension, the U.S. Government, liable for at least some of the preventable disasters associated with Hurricane Katrina should lead the government to do what it should have done long ago: Provide generous, long-tail assistance to help the residents of New Orleans get back on their feet.

To see why, just take a moment to compare what “we’ve” done for victims of another disaster: September 11. In that case, the Victim Compensation Fund was created to pay not even the survivors of that horrific event, but their families — in some cases, to the tune of millions of dollars. In all, the Fund spent just under seven billion dollars in taxpayer money for an event that the government was not responsible for.

With respect for the victims of that tragedy, I argued against such lavish compensation here and here. Part of the motivation was to avoid potentially crushing liability against  the airlines for their dismal security procedures,1 but that would have better been done through a direct bailout of those industries. Wait! We’d never bail out a failing company.

By contrast, the government awarded only the minimal payments available under federal disaster relief to Katrina’s victims, despite documented negligence (or worse) on the part of state, local, and federal government. And  the federal government, rather than defend the suits against them on the merits, has raised every possible procedural argument. First, they argued that they couldn’t be responsible for the flood-induced breaches of levees that the Corps had built or maintained, because of the Flood Control Act of 1928. That Act does clearly provide governmental immunity in connection with flood control projects, so the court held that the statute barred some of the claims.

Other claims, though, were based on acts of shocking negligence in connection with the maintenance of the White Elephant known as the Mississippi  River-Gulf Outlet (MR-GO), a navigation short-cut from New Orleans to the Gulf of Mexico. Here is a good summary of the allegations of negligence,  which were accepted by the court after a long trial:

The claimants alleged the government failed to properly design, construct, operate and maintain the MRGO, a 76-mile man-made ship navigation channel that connects the Gulf of Mexico to the Port of New Orleans Inner Harbor Navigation Canal. The claimants further alleged that the design of the MRGO (with the surface width being wider than the bottom width), along with the inevitable widening that would occur from waves in the channel, allowed the MRGO to act as a “funnel” for the Hurricane Katrina storm surge. Additionally, the salt water that was allowed to enter the MRGO from the Gulf allegedly killed off the storm-slowing plants and vegetation, further contributing to the “funnel” effect for the storm surge.

Since MR-GO isn’t a flood control project, the immunity probably doesn’t apply. But because of where MR-GO is situated relative to the damaged and destroyed neighborhoods, only residents in the Lower Ninth Ward and St. Bernard Parish were able to recover. Others are out of luck.

The government is considering an appeal. If one is filed, the brief would likely argue that the more general immunity under the Federal Tort Claims Act protects them. Interpreting and applying that immunity is challenging (for reasons that would numb any and all non-lawyers, and many lawyers as well), but my guess is that the judge’s opinion on that issue would stand.

The Government is likely afraid of the many millions of dollars it might have to pay out once others join the suit. But anyone who hasn’t already filed is barred by the statute of limitations. So the total payout that would be required isn’t clear; and in any event almost surely wouldn’t approach the amount paid out for 9/11.

Here’s a radical idea, government lawyers (Obama Administration): Settle the case! Offer structured payments. Set up enterprise zones and incentives for loans to start-up businesses. Build homes for people.  Rebuild the private medical and public health infrastructure. Such initiatives are long overdue. I have mixed feelings about tort liability against the government in any case, but surely some kind of considered, carefully designed compensation has by now become a national imperative. It won’t erase this national disgrace from our history — nothing can, or should — but it would be a compelling show of compassion.

  1. So now we have to divide our personal hygiene products into small bottles in order to board a plane.

Court Rules Army Corps Committed “MR. GO” No-No

November 19th, 2009 2 comments

This just in: Federal district court judge Stanwood Duval Jr. has awarded hundreds of thousands of dollars to Katrina victims, payable by the U.S. Government because of the negligence of the Army Corps of Engineers.

The government — the same government, by the way, that awarded billions of dollars to the surviving family members of those killed by the September 11 attacks — had tried to stand on immunity for flood-control-related projects, but the court didn’t buy it. The Mississippi River Gulf Outlet (“MR.GO,” to locals) is a shipping channel — not a flood control project — that created a shortcut from New Orleans to the Gulf of Mexico. Now seen as ill-advised, it was also, according to Duval, dismally maintained:

“It is the court’s opinion that the negligence of the Corps, in this instance by failing to maintain the MRGO properly, was not policy, but insouciance, myopia and short-sightedness.”

Unless the decision is reversed on appeal, expect many thousands of displaced and injured Katrina victims to get in line for recovery. As I’ll explain in a fuller post tomorrow, they have a strong case.