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What to do About DADT Before It’s Repealed

There’s some reason to be optimistic about DADT’s long-overdue repeal; maybe Obama wasn’t just talking last Saturday night, after all. This story about legislative stirring is a good sign. So is the newly “out”spoken military brass; this devastatingly effective essay against the policy by Air Force colonel Om Prakash appeared in Joint Forces Quarterly, and thus constitutes a clear (if not universal) military endorsement of the repeal. (Here‘s a more homely, yet effective brief against these inane discharges.)  Where Clinton failed to get buy-in for his “gays in the military” plan — and thereby impaled into legislation what had only been policy — Obama apparently has been doing the heavy background work needed to bring the military on board.

But no one thinks the policy will be repealed this year, and there is virtually no chance that Obama will issue an Executive Order halting the discharges in the meantime. He could, but he won’t: So let’s move on. Right now, we have the untenable situation that should remind one of, say, being the last to die in a war that’s been declared useless.

For the record, I don’t mind if actual gays use the policy to get out while they still can– come out and get out! They didn’t create this policy, and they shouldn’t hesitate to leave if military life under DADT becomes unbearable.

Most men and women in the military, though, don’t want to get out. Straight or gay, they define themselves as soldiers. (This is what’s most struck me in getting to know a few of those discharged under DADT, especially Alex Nicholson.) And it’s plain unconscionable for people to continue to be shown the door now that the policy looks dead.

My solution? Obama should let it be known, in whatever subtle or more directive ways are at his disposal, that discharges from now on should be limited to clear cases where someone “tells” –otherwise, the policy’s original intent that service members’ sexuality not be pursued should be revivified. This way, Obama avoids issuing an Executive Order, but stops the bleeding. I don’t care whether we know about this or not. (We’ll surely learn at some point, when the discharge numbers for 2009 and beyond are released.) Is there any reason not to do this?

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